Not Born this Way: On Transitioning as a Transwoman Who Has Never Felt “Trapped in the Wrong Body”

Not Born this Way: On Transitioning as a Transwoman Who Has Never Felt “Trapped in the Wrong Body”

Learning to love your body and make it a home

Many trans people do identify with the feeling of being trapped in the wrong skin, and they are perfectly right in doing so. I, however, don’t.

Source: Not Born this Way: On Transitioning as a Transwoman Who Has Never Felt “Trapped in the Wrong Body” – xoJane

Into my second month since I last had an orgasm, I cannot believe how horny I am! I really do feel like Liz Taylor; “a cat on a hot tin roof” with a totally gay husband. This pussy is burning up, and no satisfaction may be had. Three months minimum of this? Whoa! I don’t think it’s been that long since I was 13. The difficulties of being newly post-op.

—Valentine Lovecraft

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Difficult part after hard part, what’s the hardest part?

Difficult part after hard part, what’s the hardest part?

I was unprepared for how emotionally difficult gender reconstruction surgery would be. I knew it would be painful. I knew there would be a lot of work involved. I knew the recovery process would be long. I was not expecting how emotionally isolating it would be, and was also unprepared for how to deal emotionally with complications to surgery that I knew could happen. So difficult to be a transsexual. I tried so hard to avoid it, but it didn’t seem avoidable at all anymore.

Now I’m six years into living my truth, and I guess at least it is just barely livable now, which is something it was not before.

I’ve been thinking I need to go to my first therapist who said I wasn’t really trans and say “look, you were wrong!”. I’m so grateful I’ve had a friend to take me in. Otherwise my difficulties and healing and my loneliness would be completely overbearing.

I suspect the question in the title is a question I should avoid asking. Otherwise, like Job I may be asked to endure further hardships.